1. Happy as a Dog’s Tail by Anna Swirszczynska


Happy as something unimportant and free as a thing unimportant. As something no one prizesand which does not prize itself. As something mocked by alland which mocks at their mockery. As laughter without serious reason. As a yell able to outyell itself. Happy as no matter what,as any no matter what.Happyas a dog’s tail. 




Anna Świrszczyńska (also known as Anna Swir) (1909–1984) was a Polish poet whose works deal with themes including her experiences during World War II, motherhood, the female body, and sensuality. 

Świrszczyńska was born in Warsaw and grew up in poverty as the daughter of an artist. She began publishing her poems in the 1930s. During the Nazi occupation of Poland she joined the Polish resistance movement in World War II and was a military nurse during the Warsaw Uprising. She wrote for underground publications and once waited 60 minutes to be executed. Czesław Miłosz writes of knowing her during this time and has translated a volume of her work. Her experiences during the war strongly influenced her poetry. In 1974 she published Building the Barricade, a volume which describes the suffering she witnessed and experienced during that time. She also writes frankly about the female body in various stages of life. (via Wikipedia)

    Happy as a Dog’s Tail by Anna Swirszczynska

    Happy as something unimportant 
    and free as a thing unimportant. 
    As something no one prizes
    and which does not prize itself. 
    As something mocked by all
    and which mocks at their mockery. 
    As laughter without serious reason. 
    As a yell able to outyell itself. 
    Happy as no matter what,
    as any no matter what.

    Happy
    as a dog’s tail. 

    Anna Świrszczyńska (also known as Anna Swir) (1909–1984) was a Polish poet whose works deal with themes including her experiences during World War II, motherhood, the female body, and sensuality. 

    Świrszczyńska was born in Warsaw and grew up in poverty as the daughter of an artist. She began publishing her poems in the 1930s. During the Nazi occupation of Poland she joined the Polish resistance movement in World War II and was a military nurse during the Warsaw Uprising. She wrote for underground publications and once waited 60 minutes to be executed. Czesław Miłosz writes of knowing her during this time and has translated a volume of her work. Her experiences during the war strongly influenced her poetry. In 1974 she published Building the Barricade, a volume which describes the suffering she witnessed and experienced during that time. She also writes frankly about the female body in various stages of life. (via Wikipedia)
     
  1. thehesperides reblogged this from journalofanobody
  2. journalofanobody posted this